Page 20 - Agri 2020_24Dec
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SINGAPORE AGRI-FOOD BUSINESS DIRECTORY 2020/2021
   Combining intelligent sensors with machine learning and artificial intelligence, today’s growers are better able to tackle problems before they
imperil a harvest, and to identify environmental conditions that improve yields
MS KEE AI NAH
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
LIFESTYLE & CONSUMER CLUSTER ENTERPRISE SINGAPORE
The vegetables are grown in cleanroom- like conditions, where every aspect of the cultivation environment can be controlled, from lighting and nutrients to temperature and humidity, insulating them from the increasingly unpredictable weather. LED lights replace natural sunlight, sensors provide growers with real time insights on farming conditions, enabling smart data on irrigation, fertiliser application and harvest.
“Combining intelligent sensors with machine learning and artificial intelligence, today’s growers are better able to tackle problems before they imperil a harvest, and to identify environmental conditions that improve yields,” wrote Ms Kee Ai Nah, Executive Director, Lifestyle & Consumer Cluster, Enterprise Singapore in Indoor Ag-con, the knowledge- sharing and networking platform for the indoor agriculture industry.
Using A-shaped aluminium towers, extending up to nine metres high, Sky Greens grows tropical organic vegetables, including cai xin, jie lan and Chinese cabbage in tiered troughs. A water pulley system rotates the troughs to ensure every plant has an even distribution of natural sunlight, doing away with the need for LED lights commonly used in urban farms.
The company produces mini-vegetables, which it harvests between 21 and 24 days old, about half the time taken for normal- sized vegetables, doing away with the need for pesticides. It produces some 500 kg of vegetables a day, 10 times higher than traditional farms on the same land area.
By growing in controlled environment Sustenir Agriculture has successfully cultivated fruits and vegetables not commonly associated with tropical Singapore, like kale, arugula, basil, lettuce, cherry tomatoes and strawberries, which it supplies to the domestic market.
While most of Singapore’s vertical farms focus on vegetables, Apollo Aquaculture Group (AAG) has shown that it works equally well for fish. In 2012, AAG built a to three-storey facility in Lim Chu Kang to house six ponds – two on each level – with each 135-sq. metre pond accommodating 22,000 fish fry. By farming indoors instead of sea cages offshore which its inherent unpredictability, AAG enjoys better yields and control. At the farm everything is automated, from water conditions to feeding.
Armed with the success, AAG is going higher. At its new farm also in Lim Chu Kang, the company is going eight tier raising its yield almost 20-fold to about 2,000 tonnes. “It will be fully
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